FAQ’s for the Juiced HyperScorpion

Juiced HyperScorpion
Juiced HyperScorpion

Hope everyone is weathering winter well! I’m missing my weekend rides for sure, but it does give me more time to answer questions, and check out new bikes to review in 2021.

Today, I’m going to answer some questions I’ve received about the Juiced HyperScorpion, my experiences with it, how I feel about it, all that good stuff!

You can take a look at the full specs of the HyperScorpion on Juiced Bikes website here.

Disclaimer: Some links are affiliate links.

Probably the #1 most asked question is about height. Is the HyperScoprion good for short riders?

Yes! Most definitely. The seat height of the HyperScorpion is only about 33 inches, so it’s ideal for shorter riders. I can comfortably pedal the bike and safely control the bike at a stop, and I’m only 5’1″ with a 28″ inseam. So, if you’re on the petite side, the bike should be good for you. If you’re taller, there is a tall seat option that adds a platform under the seat to raise it to 35.6″.

Is the HyperScorpion too heavy?

The bike is heavy for an electric bike, but light for a moped. The weight of the bike isn’t noticed, at least not in a bad way, when riding. The weight adds to the stability of the bike. It just isn’t an issue when pedaling. I don’t notice the weight at all.





When weight could be an issue is when considering what type of bike rack to purchase for it. You’ll want one that is rated for mopeds or motorcycles, and definitely one with a ramp.

Working on the bike, such as changing a tire, also requires more muscle or creativity. I know other owners have built custom stands for it. If I find a good stand, I’ll be sure to pass on the news.

What changes would you like to see on the HyperScorpion?

Some changes I’d like to see are just personal preference. Other changes I think there’s universal agreement on. Most of the changes I’d like are the placement of the controls for the display, horn, and lights.

Since the HyperScorpion is a hybrid between an electric bike and moped, it shares components of both, and that can be kind of messy on the handlebars. No company has really done this before.

For one, the twist shifter for the gears is installed upside down on the left side. Personally, I’m okay with this, but I know it irks some. It doesn’t affect the operation of the gears at all, and it’s not the type of bike that you’ll be changing gears very often anyway.

twist shifter
Twist shifter with light, turn signal, horn and USB port shown

One issue that I do constantly have with the bike is leaving the turn signals on after turning. I’m not the only one. The switch isn’t in the most visible location, and there’s no blinking lights facing the rider, so it’s easy to forget or be unaware that the turn signal is still on. There needs to be some kind of highly visible and/or audible indicator to remind the rider.

I’d also like to have and easier reach to the buttons when changing pedal assist levels. It’s not bad, but it does require me taking my hand off the grip.

The display is a bit lackluster. Actually, I’d prefer a traditional moped style display in the middle of the handle bars showing the speed, mileage/KM, PAS level, and other info, and buttons near the grips.

Something I plan to change soon are the tires. While I haven’t personally had any problems with the stock tires, I’d prefer ones with more grip for safety.

I’d also like to see larger rotors for the disc brakes. The bike has good stopping power, but not great. Considering the weight and speed of the bike, they’re undersized.

The last thing is that the motor is loud in race mode. This definitely isn’t a stealthy electric bike. People will hear you coming and wonder what is coming with a strange stare. On lower PAS levels, it’s much quieter and less obnoxious.

How well does the HyperScorpion do on hills?

I ride in a flat part of the country, but there are some hills I have to contend with, and it does great. I’ve never noticed the bike bogging down on a hill. It has enough power and torque to handle most hills. Of course, it will reduce the range of the bike if you’re going up lots of hills, but it is certainly capable of climbing them.

What kind of range do you get out of the HyperScorpion on a single charge?

I get about 25 mile of range and that’s using Race Mode and Sport Mode primarily. Obviously, if you pedal more at lower PAS modes, the bike will achieve higher range. It would be great to have a second battery because this is a bike you’ll want to ride for longer rides.

Juiced HyperScorpion FAQs

Have you had any problems with the bike or Juiced customer service?

So far, I’ve never needed to contact Juiced about anything. The bike hasn’t needed any repairs or new parts yet. I know that Juiced was overwhelmed with customer service questions last year due to high demand and back-ordered components. All bike companies had a rough time last year due to production delays and high demand. A good place to ask this question is on the Facebook Juiced HyperScorpion owners group page. Juiced also monitors the page, so it’s a good place to go if you have questions or concerns.





What do you like the most about the HyperScorpion?

I like it for the reasons that I first backed it on Indiegogo and that is comfort and safety on the road. The bike’s dual suspension, plush moped style seat, and fat tires make the HyperScorpion a very comfortable bike to ride.

The form factor of the bike makes it more respected on the road. Car drivers pay attention to it much more so than a regular bicycle.

I originally thought I’d like to go fast on the bike, but I’ve come to appreciate how good it is as a cruiser. It’s enjoyable to ride such a comfortable bike at slower speeds along scenic quiet roads and bike paths. I’m always on the lookout for such places to ride.

Personally, I dislike riding any bike around street traffic, but it is nice to have a bike that is more visible and more respected on the road.

It’s surprisingly a very approachable bike to ride because it takes off so smoothly and confidently. The frame is well-balanced from front to rear. It’s not a herky jerky bike that rides squirrelly on the road. Instead, it’s more refined, and surprisingly nimble.

The torque sensor can be noticeably touchy on Race Mode though. Just a little press of the pedal will cause the motor to turn on, and you may not want that when turning. Sport Mode and Eco Mode are much milder and safer for inexperienced riders.

One concern I had about the bike was whether it would be practical to pedal. It is. It’s not as practical or as comfortable as a regular bicycle, but I do enjoy pedaling it at slower speeds. At higher speeds, I let the throttle do the work.

Overall, the Juiced HyperScorpion is in a league of its own, but it has helped open the door to electric bikes that are capable of being true commuters capable of higher speeds, and a form factor that can hold its own on the road. I look forward to continued improvements in the future.

Visit JuicedBikes.com for more about the Juiced HyperScorpion and their other bikes.